50 things to do after dark: Eat Out and Around Town

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First published on 7 Sep 2012. Updated on 24 Sep 2012.

17. Bowl with the buds

A more family-friendly form of late-night frivolity can be found at Orchid Bowl, a 32-lane bowling alley in eastern Singapore. With mechanised bumpers that are raised and lowered upon request, parents can perfect their score while their younger, less experienced spawn mow down pins without fear of gutterballs. Toddlers aren’t left out either – the complex has a miniature bowling corner featuring scaled-down balls and lanes. Orchid Bowl @ E!Hub, 1 Pasir Ris Cl (6583 1622, www.orchidbowl.com.sg). Nearest MRT: Pasir Ris. Sun-Thu 10am-1am; Fri & Sat 10am-3am. $3.20-$4.50 per person; shoes $1.20, socks $1.50.

18-19. Keep it reel

Take a break from the bar and try reeling in a different catch at one of these late-night fishing holes.

  • Hai Bin Prawning in Bishan is perfect for a bottle of beer and, if luck is on your side, a heaped-up plate of fresh prawns. It’s set up under a thatched roof with hanging red lanterns above plastic chairs that surround six ponds, all regularly filled with live prawns. Equipment and bait are included in the hourly fee, along with barbecue pits, charcoal, satay sticks and salt for seasoning. The onsite beer garden charges reasonable rates for labels like Corona and Hoegaarden ($6-$10), along with red and white wine for under $40. 603 Sin Ming Ave (6554 1986, www.haibin.com.sg). Nearest MRT: Bishan. Daily 24 hours. Prawning $18 per hour.

  • Experienced anglers head to Fishing Paradise to take on giant, South American big-game fish like the redtail catfish, mekong and arapaima. The catch-and-release fishing pond is set in serene Bottle Tree Park, which boasts three seafood restaurants. Bottle Tree Park, 81 Lorong Chencharu, Yishun (6759 7077, www.fishingparadise.com.sg). Nearest MRT: Khatib. Daily 7am-3am. Fishing $25 per hour, $45 after 9pm. Package deals available.

20. Kick off at midnight

Unable to withstand the sweltering daytime heat? With this indoor football pitch, you'll never miss a kick. Available for booking 24/7, The Cage is Singapore’s first indoor football stadium. The name derives from the facility itself, where players compete in a metal cage that fills up nearly the entire refurbished warehouse. The pitches can accommodate five-a-side matches – squeeze more friends in if you wish – and they have a music system, so plug in your iPods and dribble to the beat, or practise samba football with The Cage’s in-house beats. If you want to concentrate on your game, you can turn the system off; this is sport’s equivalent of the awkward silence. Early bookings are a must. 38 Jln Benaan Kapal (6344 9345 2009, www.thecage.com.sg). Nearest MRT: Stadium. Daily 24 hours. From $54 for two hours (for students on weekdays) to $856 for 12 hours (on weekends).

21. Indulge in a luxury massage

Aramsa's unusual location in the middle of suburban Bishan Park means that it is surrounded by nature and feels a million miles from the concrete jungle of the city centre. Individual spa suites are linked via resort-style covered walkways; some also boast sunken bathtubs in private gardens. The best part is that on Friday and Saturday nights they extend service hours until midnight. Bishan Park II, 1382 Ang Mo Kio Ave 1 (6456 6556, www.aramsaspas.com). Nearest MRT: Bishan. Sun-Thu 10am-10pm; Fri & Sat 10am-midnight.

22-23. Find your fortune

Singapore gives Vegas a run for its money with two resort casinos open for gambling all night long.

At 15,000 sq m in area, Marina Bay Sands Casino is home to approximately 500 table games and 2,500 slot machines, boasting a comprehensive selection of the newest and most popular electronic game machines across its three levels. The upper two levels also have more than 30 private gaming rooms. 10 Bayfront Ave (6688 8868, www.marinabaysands.com). Nearest MRT: Bayfront. Daily 24 hours.

Resorts World Sentosa is like candyland for every member of the family, with an oceanarium, water park, rollercoaster and swanky boutique shops. But of course there are certain things that remain adults-only, the city’s first casino being the best example. Take  your pick of top table games and slot machines. 8 Sentosa Gateway (6577 8888, www.rwsentosa.com). Nearest MRT: HarbourFront, then take a taxi or Sentosa Express. Daily 24 hours.

24-26. Indulge your sweet tooth

Here are three of our favourite sweet spots to fill after-dinner cravings

  • Holland Village’s 2am:dessert bar offers sleek, modern desserts paired with a carefully selected wine list. Try the smoked white chocolate with hibiscus jelly and cinnamon beads, or the alpaco chilli chocolate. As per its name, it stays open until 2am. 21a Lorong Liput (6291 9727, www.2amdessertbar.com). Nearest MRT: Holland Village. Mon-Sat 4pm-2am.

  • Privé Bakery Café makes for a delectable port of call at any time of the day. Anchored in the quiet waters of Keppel Bay Marina, the classy yet casual 50-seat alfresco eatery dishes out scrumptious fare such as pies, indulgent cakes and deluxe milkshakes. Marina at Keppel Bay, 2 Keppel Bay Vista (6776 0777, www.prive.com.sg). Nearest MRT: HarbourFront. Sun-Thu 9am-midnight, Fri & Sat 9am-1am.

  • The long dark wooden banquette and chequered floor give PS Cafe at Ann Siang Hill a sophisticated, Prohibition-era look. There’s a whole list of sweet cocktails here, including the staple lychee and chocolate martinis. For a real sweet kick try the Chocolate Crunch Doorstep Cake, a delicious combo of brownie with biscuit balls and chocolate mousse. 45 Ann Siang Rd (6222 3143, www.pscafe.com). Nearest MRT: Chinatown. Bar and desserts Mon-Thu & Sun 5pm-12.30am; Fri-Sat & eve of public holiday 5pm-2am.

27. Dig in to a dumpling feast

All the excitement is sure to leave you in need of some decent sustenance. While cheese prata joints line many of the surrounding Little India streets, greasy goodness can also be found at Swee Choon Tim Sum, a round-the-clock dim sum dive. Over-the-counter treats for on-the-run basics include char siew pau, siew mai and yam fritters ($0.70-$3.50). 191 Jln Besar (6225 7788, www.sweechoon.com). Nearest MRT: Farrer Park. Mon-Sat 6pm-10am; Sun & public holidays 6pm-noon.

28. Take a bite of carrot cake

Head to Newton Circus hawker centre to try a great sample of Singapore staple (chai tau kway). We recommend the Heng Carrot Cake stall, which uses vegetable oil to fry the pancake. This salted white-radish dish (it contains not a smidgen of carrot) is fried into a ‘cake’ with eggs, garlic and spring onion. It is soft on the inside, crisp on the outside and coated generously with sweet black sauce. #01-28 Newton Food Centre, 500 Clemenceau Ave North. Nearest MRT: Newton. Daily 6pm-4am.

29-30. Slurp a bowl of bak kut teh

During singapore’s trading post era, coolies traditionally ate this popular Chinese pork rib soup in the mornings for an energy boost – although we find it just as satisfying in the wee hours.

  • A ten-minute walk from Zouk, Ya Hua Bak Kut Teh sees many bleary-eyed punters piling in to its fluorescent-lit, coffee shop-style space for a bite. The bowl of ochre-hued, peppery broth perks you up instantly, and the toothy hunks of pork rib are just enough to quell hunger pangs. #01-01/02 Isetan Office Building, 593 Havelock Rd (6235 7716). Nearest MRT: Tiong Bahru. Tue-Sun 6pm-2am.

  • Out of all the bak kut teh joints dotting Balestier’s stretch, Founder Bak Kut Teh is considered the perennial champion – as proved by its constant queues and photo collage of celebrity patrons. Stick out the wait and you’ll be rewarded with generous portions of meaty ribs in throat-ticklingly peppery, garlic-laced broth that’s best slurped piping hot or soaked up with crisp, chewy you tiao (fried dough fritters). New Orchid Hotel, 347 Balestier Rd (6352 6192). Nearest MRT: Novena. Wed-Mon noon-2pm; 6pm-2.40am.

31. Spize up the night

Although the service at Spize can be a bit patchy, this never-tiring after-hours joint is a mecca for night owls hoping some food will soak up their alcohol binge. Its menu covers the greasier end of the supper scale, with classic Indian-Muslim orders like maggi goreng (fried instant noodles), cone-shaped tissue prata and roti john – a minced meat, egg and onion baguette sandwich with copious amounts of mayonnaise and chilli sauce. Western fare such as burgers and cheese-drenched fries are also available, and anything you order should go down well with a tall glass of Milo powder-topped Milo dinosaur. 409 River Valley Rd (6734 9194 www.spize.com.sg). Take a taxi. Daily 6pm-6am.

32. Eat a plate of rojak

Rojaking! – the verb to describe rojak making – was the name chosen for this stall by twenty something Rion Ong, who took over the Bedok spot from his father Ong Siong Pek. Ong Sr’s rojak made him akin to hawker royalty – aficionados would line up patiently for his pungent, sweet, salty, sour and crunchy rojak – though his son’s version (from $4) is no less addictive. The queues remain, but Rion has taken the family’s classic recipe further with his own trade secrets: you tiao (fried dough sticks), cuttlefish and tofu puffs are all toasted, then coated with Ong Sr’s home-made chilli sauce and a special rojak paste that’s made with fermented prawn paste imported from Penang. #01-405, Food Hub @ Chai Chee, 26A Chai Chee Rd. Nearest MRT: Bedok. Daily noon-2am.

33. Go for nasi lemak in the heartlands

Venture off the tourist route and sample this classic local coconut rice dish in the heartlands at Ponggol Nasi Lemak Centre. The jasmine rice's fragrance, accentuated by coconut milk, makes it a popular supper haunt among locals. The stall masters the basics of the rice dish by pairing crispy ikan bilis (anchovies) with sweet sambal chilli. The stall also greets you with a large array of at least 20 side dishes to choose from including crispy chicken wings, perfect sunny-side-up eggs, long beans fried in shrimp paste, otah (spiced fish cake) or tempura prawns. 965 Upper Serangoon Rd (6281 0020). Nearest MRT: Kovan. Fri-Wed 6pm-5am.

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By Time Out Singapore editors
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